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Policy Change: An Interpretive Analysis

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
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Abstract

Using documentary sources, this chapter analyses the way policy makers approached social security and identifies key themes in the documents and debates (social insurance, the male breadwinner model and the decline of paternalism). It also describes the social security system in 2016 and compares this with the system in 1981 to summarise the degree and pattern of change. The details of the changes over time are used to apply Pierson’s typology of welfare state change. The chapter concludes by noting the variety of ways change can take place and introduces the narratives that are given in Chapters 8–10.

Keywords

Social insurance ‘Male breadwinner’ Dependants Paternalism Individualisation Constitution 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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