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Social Security: Expenditure and Benefits

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter argues that aggregate expenditure is an imprecise measure of social security; it also argues that, suitably decomposed, it can be analysed to discern patterns and direction of welfare state change. The chapter sets out an arithmetical framework to analyse expenditure and then applies it to the major areas of Irish social security spending, such as pensions, Child Benefit and disability-related payments. The results show evidence of cost containment in the 1980s and outright retrenchment from 2008 to 2016. The analysis records trends in replacement rates and the value of benefits and reveals strikingly cyclical patterns of change.

Keywords

Expenditure Benefits Poverty Retrenchment 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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