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Social Security in Ireland 1981–2016: A Framework for Analysis

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter starts by asserting the value of a single-n research design and exploring its limitations. It then ‘places’ Ireland in a welfare regime context, explores whether the accepted comparative accounts of Ireland are wholly correct and argues that Ireland is a ‘hybrid’ welfare regime. The chapter proceeds by describing the Irish social security system in 1981 and then setting out the broad direction of change in the context for social security - economic, political and social. The conclusion argues that the underlying changes are likely to prompt quite mixed pressures on social security from 1981 to 2016.

Keywords

Regime Catholicism Corporatism De-commodification Politics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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