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The Emergence of Social Security in Ireland

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter narrates the historical development of social security in Ireland, reviews the existing accounts of its development and gives quantitative indicators of its development relative to other countries. It critically considers those studies that emphasise the so-called late development of social security and ascribe the Church a decisive role at key junctures. The chapter also shows how state-centred theories can illuminate understanding of social security in Ireland, and how mainstream narratives applicable to early industrialising countries in Europe may not apply in Ireland.

Keywords

Industrialisation Liberal Beveridge 1952 act 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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