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Understanding Welfare State Change

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter reviews the development of theories of welfare state change and shows how institutionalism emerged as the most convincing analytical approach. It outlines the core concepts of this approach and then illustrates how institutionalism has been applied to specific countries and policy contexts, and shows how the approach has been applied to analyse social security policy change.

Keywords

Functionalism Modernisation Institutionalism Globalisation Veto-point Critical juncture 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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