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Jobseekers: Conversion from Passive to Active?

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter confirms that Ireland was a late-comer to activation of Jobseekers and that historically it tended to ‘convert’ activation discourse into passive provisions and policies. The chapter documents the background to recent changes, documents the detailed changes in services and provisions and considers whether the change comprises a qualitative shift from a wholly ‘passive’ regime to an extreme form of conditionality and activation.

Keywords

Activation Jobseekers Conditionality 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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