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Impact of Exercise and Ergonomics on the Perception of Fatigue in Workers: A Pilot Study

  • A. C. H. PinettiEmail author
  • N. C. H. Mercer
  • Y. A. Zorzi
  • F. Poli
  • E. Nogiri
  • A. C. Lima
  • M. R. Oliveira
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 826)

Abstract

The supervised implementation of psychophysiological recovery breaks and physical exercise in the workplace can be motivational factors for employees to be productive and remain for a longer time at work2. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ergonomic conditions and exercise programs can reduce fatigue before, during and after work hours. In general, participants that conducted psychophysiological recovery breaks and an exercise program showed less fatigue compared with those that did not perform the program, principally in the times during and after work hours. However, the results showed no differences between groups that exercised either with or without psychophysiological recovery breaks, suggesting that the practice of exercise can be as important as rest. In conclusion, psychophysiological recovery breaks, ergonomic conditions and exercise programs may help to reduce fatigue during and after work hours.

Keywords

Ergonomics Exercise Occupational Health 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. H. Pinetti
    • 1
    Email author
  • N. C. H. Mercer
    • 2
  • Y. A. Zorzi
    • 2
  • F. Poli
    • 3
  • E. Nogiri
    • 3
  • A. C. Lima
    • 3
  • M. R. Oliveira
    • 4
  1. 1.SESIArapongasBrazil
  2. 2.SESICuritibaBrazil
  3. 3.Caemmun Industria e Comercio de Moveis LtdaArapongasBrazil
  4. 4.University Pitagoras UnoparLondrinaBrazil

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