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Higher Education: From Intellectual Asylum and Fulfilling of Social Orders to Creating Arenas for Scientific Revolutions

  • Jaan ValsinerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cultural Psychology of Education book series (CPED, volume 7)

Abstract

This conclusive chapter of the volume summarizes the different perspectives on higher education that are represented in the book. The ambivalences introduced by the “Bologna system” into higher education are outlined, with the suggestion that new alternatives to that politically motivated intervention be considered so as to guarantee the leading role of universities in the preparation of new generations of knowledge makers. A suggestion is made for establishing a privately funded University Without Borders that would raise the international collaboration to new level in the cooperation of scholars, minimizing the possibilities of pilurcal political interference into higher education by any particular country of bloc of countries.

Keywords

University without borders Bologna system Knowledge creation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to Nancy Budwig, Lene Tanggaard, Luca Tateo and Virgil and Geanina Nae for productive suggestions on the earlier draft of this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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