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New India—Universities in the Middle of Economic Development

  • Girishwar MisraEmail author
  • Rishabh Kumar Mishra
Chapter
Part of the Cultural Psychology of Education book series (CPED, volume 7)

Abstract

Higher education (HE) in its institutionalized structure primarily engages with creation, critique and dissemination of knowledge through teaching and research. It is situated within a historical context, evolves through socio-political aspirations, interfaces with economy and contributes towards shaping the culture of a community at any particular time. Thus, it is both a product as well as a process of social transformation. Against this backdrop, this chapter takes higher education in modern India as a case in point. It begins by exploring the ideal of University as conceived in India during the colonial regime and analyzes its influence on the psyche of Indian people and the way it served the interests of the British regime. It also alludes how the nationalist aspirations got reflected through HE and contributed to the freedom movement. Further, the chapter throws light on the ways the Indian democratic State embraced HE as an impetus for sustaining constitutional values i.e. secularism, equity, fraternity etc. along with promotion of scientific temperament and technological development. The different phases of the developmental trajectory of HE are traced and its interface with the State, society and culture is indicated. In this process, HE significantly expanded itself and reached to the masses. In the course of time, HE shifted its emphasis towards professional education to meet the demands of market. The next section analyzes how the State’s role has changed during the last few decades and how the private sector emerged as a significant player in the field of HE. It also identifies some of the significant consequences of the move towards privatisation. Finally, some suggestions are offered to address the duel goal of meeting global standards and addressing the local concerns.

Keywords

University–industry relations India Freedom of structure 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge the comments and input from Prof. Anand Prakash, Dr. Preeti Kapur, Sri. Samarjeet Yadav and Dr. Ravneet Kaur on an earlier draft of the paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mahatma Gandhi International Hindi UniversityWardhaIndia

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