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The Plagiarism Controversy

  • Giles WhiteleyEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter focuses on the controversy over Coleridge’s plagiarism from Schelling, one which raged throughout the nineteenth century. It analyses the key documents in this plagiarism controversy by figures including Thomas de Quincey, Julius Hare and James Ferrier, amongst others. The chapter continues the stakes of this debate both in Anglo-Scottish critical relations during the period, and in terms of the role played by this controversy in shaping some of the later responses to Schelling in the British literature of the period.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.StockholmSweden

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