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Schelling’s Reception in Scotland, 1817–1833

  • Giles WhiteleyEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter focuses on Schelling’s reception in Scotland in the late Romantic period. It begins with a consideration of the ways in which Schelling’s thought was dismissed by the late common sense philosophy of Dugald Stewart, before analysing the key role William Hamilton’s ‘The Philosophy of the Unconditioned’ played in disseminating Schelling’s thinking. The second half of the chapter then turns to John Carlyle, who studied with Schelling in Munich, and his more famous brother, Thomas Carlyle, who Schelling himself read. The chapter concludes with a major rereading of Carlyle’s great ironic novel, Sartor Resartus, problematising the standard Fichtean approaches to the work.

Keywords

The Unconditioned Sartor Resartus Dugald Applied Christianity Intellektuelle Anschauung 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.StockholmSweden

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