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“Child Labour” and Children’s Lives

  • Michael Bourdillon
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies on Children and Development book series (PSCD)

Abstract

While child labour is often considered to be a problem of the Global South and largely overcome in the Global North, it is more useful to consider different approaches as relating to access to status and resources. Children’s work can convey both benefits and harm; those with access to resources focus on risks of harm, whereas others are more concerned about risks of losing possible benefits, creating tension between different approaches with elites often imposing their perspectives on those who value the benefits of work. This chapter outlines benefits, which are often ignored in discourse and intervention relating to child labour. It goes on to discuss the concept of child labour, which conflates harmful work with work assessed by age of employment, resulting frequently in a mismatch between the protective aims of intervention and damaging outcomes in children’s lives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Bourdillon
    • 1
  1. 1.African Studies Centre LeidenUniversity of ZimbabweHarareZimbabwe

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