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Introduction

  • Christopher J. FergusonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The impact of video games is often debated in society, sometimes in response to tragic shootings, sometimes in regard to potential positive outcomes. At times, these debates can become acrimonious and unproductive, even among scholars. However, there are also excellent opportunities for scholars to dialogue and debate across differences. Such debates can be both intellectually stimulating and fun. This book covers some of the major debates related to video games with opposing scholars on each issue. It is hoped that this approach will demonstrate that video game debates needn’t always be heated. Even if scholars differ in respect to their views of video game influences, we can still part as friends.

Keywords

Video games Debates Moral panic Controversy 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyStetson UniversityDeLandUSA

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