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Social Justice Approaches to Mass Atrocity Education

  • Susan JacobowitzEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the development of the 2013–2014 National Endowment for the Humanities/Kupferberg Holocaust Center (NEH/KHC) Colloquium Series and the motivation behind utilizing interdisciplinary and social justice approaches in the teaching of the Holocaust, genocide, and mass atrocity. It reviews the pedagogical theories that support encouraging students to relate the Holocaust to ongoing challenges in society and to their own lives, and it introduces additional examples of social justice instruction.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EnglishQueensborough Community College, CUNYBaysideUSA

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