Advertisement

A Biochip Based Medical Device for Point-of-Care ABO Compatibility: Towards a Smart Transfusion Line

  • Karine Charrière
  • Alain Rouleau
  • Olivier Gaiffe
  • Pascal Morel
  • Véronique Bourcier
  • Christian Pieralli
  • Wilfrid Boireau
  • Lionel Pazart
  • Bruno WacogneEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 881)

Abstract

ABO mismatch between donor and patient’s blood is still the cause of accidents which are sometimes lethal. The main causes of mis-assignment are human errors and wrong identification of patients or blood product. Only a final compatibility test at the patient’s bedside can avoid these errors. In some countries, this test is performed using manual procedures. This does not prevent from human manipulation and interpretation errors. In this paper, we present a prototype able to automatically perform a final ABO compatibility test. It relies on the use of disposable antibodies grafted biochips inserted into a mobile reader/actuator. Red blood cells are selectively captured on biochips grafted with antibodies complementary of antigens present on the cells surface. Detection of captured cells is based on optical absorption techniques. So far, our device achieved blood compatibility test with 99.3% sensitivity and 97.9% specificity.

Keywords

Biosensor Surface Plasmon Resonance Human red blood cells Automated ABO compatibility test Optical detection Opto-fluidic prototype 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was partly supported by the EFS (grant DECO-13-0128), the INSERM-CNRS (patent file CNRS/REF:02682-V), OSEO and the University of Franche-Comté (grant A1105005I). This work is developed in the frame of the French RENATECH network and the Biom’@x transversal axis at FEMTO-ST.

References

  1. 1.
  2. 2.
    ANSM: Bilans/Rapports d’activité - Bilans et rapports d’activité - ANSM : Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament et des produits de santé. http://ansm.sante.fr/Mediatheque/Publications/Bilans-Rapports-d-activite-Bilans-et-rapports-d-activite#folder_26762
  3. 3.
    Cid, J., Nogués, N., Montero, R., Hurtado, M., Briega, A., Parra, R.: Comparison of three microtube column agglutination systems for antibody screening: DG Gel, DiaMed-ID and ortho BioVue. Transfus. Med. 16, 131–136 (2006).  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3148.2006.00655.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Langston, M.M., Procter, J.L., Cipolone, K.M., Stroncek, D.F.: Evaluation of the gel system for ABO grouping and D typing. Transfusion 39, 300–305 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Malomgre, W., Neumeister, B.: Recent and future trends in blood group typing. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 393, 1443–1451 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Quinn, J.G., O’Neill, S., Doyle, A., McAtamney, C., Diamond, D., MacCraith, B.D., O’Kennedy, R.: Development and application of surface plasmon resonance-based biosensors for the detection of cell-ligand interactions. Anal. Biochem. 281, 135–143 (2000).  https://doi.org/10.1006/abio.2000.4564CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Quinn, J.G., O’Kennedy, R., Smyth, M., Moulds, J., Frame, T.: Detection of blood group antigens utilising immobilised antibodies and surface plasmon resonance. J. Immunol. Methods 206, 87–96 (1997).  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-1759(97)00092-6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Berthier, A., Elie-Caille, C., Lesniewska, E., Delage-Mourroux, R., Boireau, W.: Label-free sensing and atomic force spectroscopy for the characterization of protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions: application to estrogen receptors. J. Mol. Recognit. 24, 429–435 (2011).  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmr.1106CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Boozer, C., Kim, G., Cong, S., Guan, H., Londergan, T.: Looking towards label-free biomolecular interaction analysis in a high-throughput format: a review of new surface plasmon resonance technologies. Curr. Opin. Biotechnol. 17, 400–405 (2006).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2006.06.012CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Campbell, C., Kim, G.: SPR microscopy and its applications to high-throughput analyses of biomolecular binding events and their kinetics. Biomaterials 28, 2380–2392 (2007).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2007.01.047CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Mansuy-Schlick, V., Delage-Mourroux, R., Jouvenot, M., Boireau, W.: Strategy of macromolecular grafting onto a gold substrate dedicated to protein–protein interaction measurements. Biosens. Bioelectron. 21, 1830–1837 (2006).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2005.11.021CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Krupin, O., Wang, C., Berini, P.: Selective capture of human red blood cells based on blood group using long-range surface plasmon waveguides. Biosens. Bioelectron. 53, 117–122 (2014).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2013.09.051CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ferraz, A., Carvalho, V., Soares, F.: Development of a human blood type detection automatic system. In: Eurosensors Xxiv Conference, vol. 5, pp. 496–499 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Ferraz, A., Carvalho, V.: A prototype for blood typing based on image processing. In: SENSORDEVICES 2013: The Fourth International Conference on Sensor Device Technologies and Applications, pp. 139–144 (2013)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ramasubramanian, M.K., Alexander, S.P.: An integrated fiberoptic–microfluidic device for agglutination detection and blood typing. Biomed. Microdevices 11, 217–229 (2009).  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10544-008-9227-yCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ramasubramanian, M., Anthony, S., Lambert, J.: Simplified spectraphotometric method for the detection of red blood cell agglutination. Appl. Opt. 47, 4094–4105 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Wacogne, B., Boireau, W., Morel, P., Pazart, L., Pieralli, C.: Device for taking a sample of a body fluid and method for implementing same (2011)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Wacogne, B., Boireau, W., Morel, P., Pazart, L., Pieralli, C.: Secure perfusion system (2011)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Charrière, K., Rouleau, A., Gaiffe, O., Fertey, J., Morel, P., Bourcier, V., Pieralli, C., Boireau, W., Pazart, L., Wacogne, B.: Biochip technology applied to an automated ABO compatibility test at the patient bedside. Sens. Actuators B Chem. 208, 67–74 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2014.10.123CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Charrière, K., Guerrini, J.-S., Wacogne, B., Rouleau, A., Elie-Caille, C., Pieralli, C., Pazart, L., Morel, P., Boireau, W.: SmarTTransfuser - a biochip system for the final ABO compatibility test. In: Présenté à International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices (BIODEVICES 2012), Vilamoura, Portugal (2012)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Charrière, K., Rouleau, A., Gaiffe, O., Morel, P., Bourcier, V., Pieralli, C., Boireau, W., Pazart, L., Wacogne, B.: An automated medical device for ultimate ABO compatibility test at the patient’s bedside - towards the automation of point-of-care transfusion safety. In: Présenté à International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices (BIODEVICES 2015), Lisbon, Portugal (2015)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karine Charrière
    • 1
  • Alain Rouleau
    • 2
  • Olivier Gaiffe
    • 2
  • Pascal Morel
    • 3
  • Véronique Bourcier
    • 4
  • Christian Pieralli
    • 2
  • Wilfrid Boireau
    • 2
  • Lionel Pazart
    • 1
  • Bruno Wacogne
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.INSERM CIC 1431, Besançon University HospitalBesançon cedexFrance
  2. 2.FEMTO-ST Institute, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, CNRSBesançon cedexFrance
  3. 3.Etablissement Français du Sang Bourgogne/Franche-ComtéBesançon cedexFrance
  4. 4.Hemovigilance Service, Besançon University HospitalBesançon cedexFrance

Personalised recommendations