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Hayek and Popper on Historicism, Hegel, and Totalitarian Regimes

  • Birsen FilipEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Archival Insights into the Evolution of Economics book series (AIEE)

Abstract

This chapter investigates the points of convergence between Hayek and Popper’s respective critiques of the historicist approach, their accusations that Hegel was one of the main contributors to the development of historicism, and the theoretical errors they made in labelling Hegel a historicist theorist and an important figure in modern totalitarianism. Both Hayek and Popper lacked adequate knowledge about Hegel’s work and, as a result, committed theoretical errors in their respective interpretations of Hegel’s political thoughts, leading them to make the misguided accusations that he was an enemy of the open society, a historicist theorist, and an important figure in modern totalitarianism.

Keywords

Hegel Hayek Totalitarianism Polanyi Liberalism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of OttawaOttawaCanada

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