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Public Spaces - For People or Not for People?

Conference paper
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Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 788)

Abstract

Public spaces are, as a matter of principle, meant for people. It does not matter whether it be local residents, incoming guests or tourists. Just as our lives and the manner in which people spend their leisure time change, so do the requirement as to the public spaces. One could even say that these requirements are constantly growing. At present, a mere bench, tree or a fountain will just not serve. One could even raise a question as to how the contemporary public spaces should look? What functions and attractions should they include? How should the architects meet those new requirements? Answers to all those specific questions shall be answered. The authors shall subject some exemplary public spaces to the process of evaluation. Conclusions drawn shall be prepared on the basis of completed qualitative research. At the close, a recipe for a public space, both model and attractive, shall be created.

Keywords

Architecture Public space Ergonomics Qualitative research 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of ArchitectureSilesian University of TechnologyGliwicePoland

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