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A Historical View on Mental Illness in Commercial Aviation: The Crash of Japan Airlines 350

Conference paper
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Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 786)

Abstract

We applied a systems theoretical hazard analysis to the accident of JL350 to reanalyze this unique case of pilot homicide-suicide from a contemporary perspective. It is the only known case in which people had survived the crash. Having collected all information on the accident, we present a comprehensive analysis of the homicide-suicide and its countermeasures established afterwards. This sheds light on how the Japanese system of commercial aviation has responded. An aeromedical research center provides the Japanese aviation society with the latest knowledge on medicine, including mental health, to keep the stakeholders informed which enables them to react to changing requirements. In Europe, similar countermeasures were recommended decades later to address the mental health issues of pilots.

Keywords

Systems theory Homicide-suicide In-flight incapacitation Accident modelling STAMP 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Flight Guidance, German Aerospace Center (DLR)BrunswickGermany

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