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Time Marching Problems

  • Lars Petter RøedEmail author
Chapter
  • 690 Downloads
Part of the Springer Textbooks in Earth Sciences, Geography and Environment book series (STEGE)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to present some properties inherent in the governing equations listed in Sect.  1.1. Most problems in the geophysical sciences, including atmospheres, oceans, seas, and lakes, involve solving so-called time marching problems. Typically, the state of the fluid in question is known at one specific time. As postulated by Bjerknes (Meteor Z 21:1–7, 1904) in his comments on weather forecasting (see quote in the preface), the aim is then to predict the state of the fluid at a later time. This is done by solving the governing equations listed in Sect.  1.1. Such problems are known in mathematics as initial value problems.

Keywords

Diffusion Flux Vector Individual Fluid Parcels Nyquist Wavelength Field Tracer Finite Difference Version 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeosciencesUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.Norwegian Meteorological InstituteOsloNorway

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