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Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Patricia A. Prelock
  • Tiffany L. Hutchins
Chapter
Part of the Best Practices in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health Care book series (BPCABHC)

Abstract

In this final chapter, autism spectrum disorder is described including prevalence considerations, comorbidities, and diagnostic practices, as well as areas of specific challenge in joint attention and theory of mind. The gold standards for assessment are highlighted, and considerations for interventions are presented guided by the National Standards Project and the National Professional Development Center.

Keywords

Autism Autism spectrum disorder Social interaction Diagnosis Early indicators Joint attention Theory of mind Assessment Intervention Children 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia A. Prelock
    • 1
  • Tiffany L. Hutchins
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Nursing & Health SciencesUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Communication Sciences & DisordersUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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