Advertisement

Early Theories and Practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and How They Have Been Augmented and Revised During the Last Three Decades

  • Albert EllisEmail author
Chapter
  • 800 Downloads

Abstract

A large number of Rational-Emotive Therapy theories and practices that I wrote about in the mid-1950s and early-1960s and that I largely summarized in my book, Reason and Emotion in Psychotherapy (Ellis, 1962), are still central tenets of REBT. These include the following:

References

  1. Bernard, M. E. (Ed.). (1991). Using rational-emotive therapy effectively: A practitioner’s guide. New York, NY: Plenum.Google Scholar
  2. Bernard, M. E., & Ellis, A. (1998). Albert Ellis at 85: Professional reflections. Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 16, 151–181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bernard, M. E., & Joyce, M. R. (1984). Rational-emotive therapy with children and adolescents (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
  4. Ellis, A. (1962). Reason and emotion in psychotherapy. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel.Google Scholar
  5. Ellis, A. (1994). Reason and emotion in psychotherapy. Revised and updated. Secaucus, NJ: Carol Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  6. Ellis, A. (1996a). Better, deeper and more enduring brief therapy. New York, NY: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  7. Ellis, A. (1996b). How to maintain and enhance your rational emotive behavior therapy gains (Rev. ed.). New York, NY: Institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy.Google Scholar
  8. Ellis, A. (1997). Postmodern ethics for active-directive counseling and psychotherapy. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 18, 211–225.Google Scholar
  9. Ellis, A. (1998a). How rational emotive behavior therapy belongs in a constructivist camp. In M. F. Hoyt (Ed.), The handbook of constructivist therapies (pp. 83–99). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  10. Ellis, A. (1998b). How to control your anxiety before it controls you. Secaucus, NJ: Carol Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  11. Ellis, A. (1999). How to make yourself happy and remarkably less disturbable. San Luis Obispo, CA: Impact Publishers.Google Scholar
  12. Ellis, A., & Blau, S. (Eds.). (1998). The Albert Ellis reader. Secaucus, NJ: Carol Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  13. Ellis, A., & Dryden, W. (1997). The practice of rational-emotive behavior therapy. New York, NY: Springer.Google Scholar
  14. Ellis, A., Gordon, J., Neenan, M., & Palmer, S. (1998). Stress counseling. New York, NY: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Ellis, A., & Harper, R. A. (1997). A guide to rational living. North Hollywood, CA: Melvin Powers.Google Scholar
  16. Ellis, A., & MacLaren, C. (1998). Rational-emotive behavior therapy: A therapist’s guide. San Luis Obispo, CA: Impact Publishers.Google Scholar
  17. Ellis, A., & Tafrate, C. (1997). How to control your anger before it controls you. Secaucus, NJ: Birch Lane Press.Google Scholar
  18. Ellis, A., & Velten, E. (1998). Optimal aging: Get over getting older. Chicago, IL: Open Court Publishing.Google Scholar
  19. Knaus, W. (1974). Rational emotive education. New York, NY: Albert Ellis Institute.Google Scholar
  20. Mahoney, M. (1975). Scientist as subject. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.Google Scholar
  21. Wolfe, J. L. (Speaker). (1980). Woman—assert yourself. Cassette recording. New York, NY: Institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy.Google Scholar
  22. Wolpe, J. (1958). Psychotherapy by reciprocal inhibition. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Albert Ellis InstituteNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations