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The Strategic Dilemma of Authoritarian Elections

  • Gail J. Buttorff
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces readers to the strategic dilemma of authoritarian elections and lays out the central questions to be addressed in the book. The chapter also offers a brief summary of existing explanations of election boycotts and their limitations. In addition, the chapter provides an overview of Buttorff’s central argument and main contributions to the study of contentious and authoritarian elections in the Arab world.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gail J. Buttorff
    • 1
  1. 1.Hobby School of Public AffairsUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA

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