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The Obliteration of Heritage of the Jumma People and the Role of Government: The Story of the Chittagong Hill Tracts

  • Rumana Hashem
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Cultural Heritage and Conflict book series (PSCHC)

Abstract

This chapter examines the causes and consequences of a 27-year ethnic conflict in south-east Bangladesh, and explores the multi-layered and intersectional power relations between different groups of men and women in the Chittagong Hill Tracts. It discusses the role of different regimes in the construction of cultural and ethnic conflict between the Bengali and Jumma people in a supposedly secular state. The successive governments of Bangladesh, by depreciating certain heritage, have created nationalist conflict in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rumana Hashem
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and BelongingUniversity of East LondonLondonUK

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