Advertisement

Cultural Contestation: Heritage, Identity and the Role of Government

  • Jeroen RodenbergEmail author
  • Pieter Wagenaar
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Cultural Heritage and Conflict book series (PSCHC)

Abstract

This chapter aims to bring together two related concepts from political science and heritage studies: cultural contestation and contested heritage, which are the central concepts of this volume. Although these concepts are to a large degree intertwined, they have until now not been related to each other. Yet it is exactly the bringing together of these disciplines, by combining the concepts of cultural contestation and contested heritage, which are key to getting a better understanding of the role of governments in heritage practices. This chapter also gives a short overview of the contributions to the volume and of their relation to each other and to the core concepts of the book.

References

  1. Bendix, R. F., Eggert, A., & Peselman, A. (Eds.). (2012). Heritage Regimes and the State. Göttingen Studies in Cultural Property (Vol. 6). Göttingen: Universitätsverlag Göttingen.Google Scholar
  2. Carbone, C. (2017, October 18). Which Confederate Statues Were Removed? A Running List. Available at: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/18/which-confederate-statues-were-removed-running-list.amp.html. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  3. Graham, B., & Howard, P. (2008). Introduction. In B. Graham & P. Howard (Eds.), The Ashgate Companion to Heritage and Identity (pp. 1–18). Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  4. Graham, B., Ashworth, G. J., & Tunbridge, J. E. (2016). A Geography of Heritage: Power, Culture and Economy. Abingdon and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  5. Hall, S. (2005). Whose Heritage? Un-settling ‘the Heritage’, Re-imagining the Post-nation. In J. Littler & R. Naidoo (Eds.), The Politics of Heritage and the Lagacies of ‘Race’ (pp. 23–35). Abingdon and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  6. Harrison, R. (2010). The Politics of Heritage. In R. Harrison (Ed.), Understanding the Politics of Heritage (pp. 154–196). Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Jones, S. (2005). Making Place, Resisting Displacement: Conflicting National and Local Identities in Scotland. In J. Littler & R. Naidoo (Eds.), The Politics of Heritage and the Lagacies of ‘Race’ (pp. 94–114). Abingdon and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. Kenning, C. (2017, August 15). U.S. Cities Step Up Removal of Confederate Statues, Despite Virginia Violence. Reuters. Available at: http://reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN1AV0XE. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  9. Laurence, A. (2010). Heritage as a Tool of Government. In R. Harrison (Ed.), Understanding the Politics of Heritage (pp. 81–114). Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Logan, W., & Reeves, K. (Eds.). (2009). Places of Pain and Shame: Dealing with ‘Difficult Heritage’. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  11. Lowenthal, D. (1985). The Past Is a Foreign Country. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Lowenthal, D. (1998). The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Rodenberg, J. (2015). De bestuurlijke omgang met verleden, heden en toekomst: of hoe de Noordoostpolder geen Werelderfgoed werd. In R. van Diepen, W. van der Most, en H. Pruntel (Eds.), Polders peilen. Cultuurhistorisch jaarboek voor Flevoland (pp. 130–154). Lelystad: de Twaalfde Provincie.Google Scholar
  14. Ross, M. H. (2007). Cultural Contestation in Ethnic Conflict. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Ross, M. H. (2009a). Cultural Contestation and the Symbolic Landscape: Politics by Other Means? In M. H. Ross (Ed.), Culture and Belonging in Devided Societies. Contestation and Symbolic Landscapes (pp. 1–24). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  16. Ross, M. H. (Ed.). (2009b). Culture and Belonging in Devided Societies. Contestation and Symbolic Landscapes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  17. Shankar, A. (2017, August 17). Removing Racist Statues Is ‘Taking History to Task’ in South Africa. Available at: https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-08-17/removing-racist-statues-taking-history-task-south-africa. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  18. Shear, M. D, & Haberman, M. (2017, August 15). Trump Defends Initial Remarks on Charlottesville: Again Blames ‘Both Sides’. New York Times. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/15/us/politics/trump-press-conference-charlottesville.html. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  19. Silberman, N. A. (1995). Promised Lands and Chosen People: The Politics and Poetics of Archaeological Narrative. In P. L. Kohl & C. Fawcett (Eds.), Nationalism, Politics and the Practice of Archaeology (pp. 249–262). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Smith, L. (2006). Uses of Heritage. Abingdon and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  21. Tavernise, S. (2017, August 30). A Boom in Confederate Monuments, on Private Land. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/30/us/confederate-monuments.html. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  22. The New York Times. (2017, Augustus 28). Confederate Monuments Are Coming Down Across the United States. Here’s a List. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/08/16/us/confederate-monuments-removed.html. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  23. Thrasher, S. W. (2015, July 4). You Can’t Ignore the Confederate Flag. But You Can Burn It and Then Bury It. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/04/confederate-flag-burn-it-bury-it. Accessed 19 Dec 2017.
  24. Tunbridge, J. E., & Ashworth, G. J. (1996). Dissonant Heritage: The Management of the Past as a Resource in Conflict. Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
  25. Waterton, E. (2005). Whose Sense of Place? Reconciling Archaeological Landscapes in England. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 11(4), 309–325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Waterton, E. (2010). Politics, Policy and the Discourses of Heritage in Britain. Houdsmills: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Waterton, E., Laurajane, L. Smith, & Campbell, G. (2006). The Utility of Discourse Analysis to Heritage Studies: The Burra Charter and Social Inclusion. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 12(4), 339–355.  https://doi.org/10.1080/13527250600727000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vrije Universiteit AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations