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Investigating the Behavior of Sequence Typing on the Mobile Devices

  • Hsi-Jen ChenEmail author
  • Chia-Ming Kuo
  • Yung-Chueh Cheng
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10902)

Abstract

Text entry on any small mobile devices, such as a smartphone remains challenging and inconvenient. The “lack of realistic tactile feedback” on the touch screens and “the screen sizes wuld limit the key sizes” have not been fully overcome yet. In addition, when entering text, the fingers have to move constantly and quickly to locate letters in a limited area. Therefore, this research aims at “the relationships between finger movement speeds, distances, directions and accuracies while making continuous data entry inside the keyboard areas of the mobile devices”. We developed an App for data entry testing to analyze how the finger movement directions, speeds, distances would affect the falling points of the data entry. The results showed that the directions of the finger movements would affect the touch point positions. It’s more significant along the vertical axis than the horizontal axis. Moreover, only the fingers’ moving speeds and movement distances would affect the taping accuracy, and the fingers’ moving directions would not have influence on the taping accuracy.

Keywords

User interfaces Interaction styles Mobile device Text entry Touchscreen 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Cheng Kung UniversityTainanTaiwan

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