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Scientific Foundations for Addiction Practice

  • Antoine Douaihy
  • H. Patrick Driscoll
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews comprehensively the theoretical and explanatory models of addiction, evidence-based approaches and principles intertwined with the humanistic foundations of addiction treatments.

Keywords

DSM Confrontation Motivational interviewing Evidence-based treatments Relapse prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoine Douaihy
    • 1
  • H. Patrick Driscoll
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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