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The Policy Stream

  • Oscar Fitch-Roy
  • Jenny Fairbrass
Chapter
Part of the Progressive Energy Policy book series (PEP)

Abstract

John Kingdon expresses the significance of ideas in his vision of the policy process by paraphrasing Victor Hugo: ‘Greater than the tread of mighty armies is an idea whose time has come’. The policy stream is where ideas are born and developed, combined and recombined, polished and prepared for their moment in the sun. This chapter follows the Brussels climate and energy policy community concerned as it trials tests and contests ideas about the 2030 targets in the several years leading up to 2014. The significant divisions within the policy community wrought by ideas are explored towards the end of the chapter.

Keywords

Policy communities Techno-economic modelling Technology neutrality European Union 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Energy Policy GroupUniversity of ExeterPenrynUK
  2. 2.Norwich Business SchoolUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK

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