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Representation

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Part of the New Directions in the Philosophy of Science book series (NDPS)

Abstract

In this chapter, the required philosophical foundation for a representation-based account of interdisciplinarity is explicated. Focus is mostly on the work of Ronald Giere, Stephen Downes, Michael Weisberg, Bas van Fraassen, and Martin Thomson-Jones. Through discussing the positions of these philosophers, an enriched version of Giere’s account of scientific representation is developed. The chapter ends by summing up why this constitutes a good foundation for an approach-based framework.

Keywords

Propositional View Bridging Procedure Semantic View Post-interaction State Explaining Science 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aalborg UniversityCopenhagenDenmark

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