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Defiant Subjects: Religion in World Polity Theory and Public Discourse

  • Paul BramadatEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in International Relations book series (PSIR)

Abstract

Most cosmopolitan liberals might now consider it gauche to argue that the political forms and norms with which we are so comfortable are harbingers of something akin to Francis Fukuyama’s “end of history,” especially since the twin shocks of 2016—the election of Donald Trump in the USA and the victory of the Brexit campaign in the UK—suggest that we are witnessing in fact “the return of history” (Welsh 2017).

Keywords

World Polity Theory Defiant Subjects Twin Shocks Brexit Campaign Vaccine Hesitancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Studies in Religion and SocietyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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