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Militarism and Masculinity in Dungeons & Dragons

  • Aaron Trammell
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Games in Context book series (PAGCON)

Abstract

This chapter considers the construction of masculinity in Dungeons & Dragons and explains its ever-present connections to military weaponry, strategy, culture, and technology. It takes a historical approach that is grounded in Foucauldian genealogy, arguing that the cultures of masculinity in Dungeons & Dragons can be discursively traced through published manuals and articles about the game. Drawing on fan conversations found in The Dragon, it compares the representations of masculinity found in these historic texts to the ways that masculinity is represented today in the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons. In staging this comparison, it shows how depictions of masculinity have progressed over the 40-year life span of Dungeons & Dragons, but also how they have stayed the same.

Keywords

Masculinity Tabletop games Analog games Militarism Media genealogy 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aaron Trammell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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