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The Two Cultures; the Strangeness of Knowledge; the Demand for Originality

  • John G. Fitch
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine book series (PLSM)

Abstract

This chapter examines the issue of ‘The Two Cultures’, i.e. the segregation between the Arts and the Sciences in the academic systems of the English-speaking world. This chapter also discusses two other factors that might appear to militate against knowledge-based poetry. One of these is the newness and strangeness of much of our current knowledge, which means that poets cannot draw on long-established emotional associations of such knowledge, and social adjustments to it. The other factor is the demand that poets should be ‘original’ in their subject-matter, a demand which would seem to preclude poets from writing about knowledge created by others.

Keywords

Two Cultures C.P. Snow Wordsworth Edwin Morgan Originality Wendell Berry 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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