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A Neoclassical Realist Approach to Military Doctrines

  • Paolo Rosa
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes some of the major explanations of military doctrines. In particular, three approaches are analysed: The balance of power model; the organisational model; and the strategic culture approach. The balance of power model emphasises the role of international factors to explain the development of military doctrines. It emphasises the international structure, the distribution of power and the role played by external threats and action-reaction logic in stimulating the development of military doctrines. The organisational model stresses the role played by organisational culture and bureaucratic interests. The strategic culture approach stresses the importance of socially embedded images of international politics and war for the development of military doctrine. After a review of these approaches, a neoclassical realist model is advanced.

Keywords

Military doctrine Nuclear doctrine Neoclassical realism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of TrentoTrentoItaly

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