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Creativity, Criticality and Engaging the Senses in Higher Education: Creating Online Opportunities for Multisensory Learning and Assessment

  • Stefanie SinclairEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter considers why there is a need for a greater focus on creativity in higher education and critically explores how digital technology can be used to facilitate creative, multisensory learning and assessment in higher education, particularly, though not exclusively, at a distance. It introduces and critically appraises three forms of assessment used in Religious Studies and Philosophy modules at the Open University, including the assessment of digital audio recordings of oral presentations, presentation slides and a ‘Take a picture of religion’ activity involving digital photography.

Keywords

Multisensory learning Creativity Higher education Online learning Assessment Digital technology Online teaching 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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