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Our Progeny’s Monsters: Frankenstein Retold for Children in Picturebooks and Graphic Novels

  • Emily Alder
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Global Science Fiction book series (SGSF)

Abstract

Frankenstein is surprisingly well suited to stories aimed at children and is often adapted for young readerships. This chapter explores why, through a focus on graphic narratives. I examine five books: picturebooks Do Not Build a Frankenstein! by Neil Numberman (HarperCollins, New York, 2009) and The Monsters’ Monster by Patrick McDonnell (Little, Brown and Company, New York, 2012), graphic novels by Chris Mould (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1997) and Marion Mousse (Papercutz, New York, 2009), both titled Frankenstein, and Margrete Lamond and Drahoš Zak’s illustrated novel adaptation, Frankenstein (HarperCollins, Sydney, 2005). These texts adapt Shelley’s plot or offer new stories based (sometimes loosely) on her novel’s characters and tropes, creatively exploiting pre-existing knowledge of the story and its iconography. The narratives’ complexities emerge through the interplay between pictures and words, both demanding and enabling active reading strategies by young (and adult) readers.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Alder
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Arts and Creative IndustriesEdinburgh Napier UniversityEdinburghUK

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