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An Exploration of Design Cues for Heuristic-Based Decision-Making About Information Sharing

  • Joslenne PeñaEmail author
  • Mary Beth Rosson
  • Jun Ge
  • Eunsun Jeong
  • S. Shyam Sundar
  • Jinyoung Kim
  • Andrew Gambino
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10766)

Abstract

We report an exploratory study of web application interface cues that were designed to trigger cognitive heuristics thought to influence personal information disclosure. Building from prior work focused on identifying the presence and nature of such heuristics, we designed prototypes of simple web information applications that request personal information and inserted specific visual elements intended to evoke a heuristic . Using a combination of application walkthroughs (with think aloud comments) and retrospective interviews about what users’ experiences and reactions were, we investigated the possible impact of the interface cues and corresponding heuristics. Although we found little direct impact of the interface cues, users did share a variety of concerns and strategies related to their decision making. We discuss implications for the heuristics used in this study, as well as for the design of privacy-preserving interfaces.

Keywords

Privacy by design Decision-making Design Cognitive heuristics Information disclosure 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was partially supported by the U. S. National Science Foundation via Standard Grant No. CNS1450500.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joslenne Peña
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mary Beth Rosson
    • 1
  • Jun Ge
    • 1
  • Eunsun Jeong
    • 1
  • S. Shyam Sundar
    • 2
  • Jinyoung Kim
    • 2
  • Andrew Gambino
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Human Computer Interaction, College of Information Sciences and TechnologyPenn State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Media Effects Research Laboratory, College of CommunicationsPenn State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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