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Decolonised Education: Cultivating Curriculum Renewal and Decoloniality

  • Yusef Waghid
  • Faiq Waghid
  • Zayd Waghid
Chapter
  • 160 Downloads

Abstract

At the time of implementing Teaching for Change for a second time via the FutureLearn platform, one of us had been invited to offer presentations at two institutional initiatives regarding university curriculum renewal. Considering that Stellenbosch University is celebrating 100 years of existence, the institutional management deemed it apposite to commemorate the occasion by making curriculum renewal one of its primary initiatives. The latter in itself is an acknowledgement that the rationale that undergirds teaching and learning ought to be reconceptualised in relation to a different university context. What is even more poignant about the renewal agenda of the institution is its focus on decolonisation and decoloniality in relation to curriculum change.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yusef Waghid
    • 1
  • Faiq Waghid
    • 2
  • Zayd Waghid
    • 3
  1. 1.Education Policy StudiesStellenbosch UniversityStellenboschSouth Africa
  2. 2.Centre for Innovative Learning TechnologyCape Peninsula University of TechnologyCape TownSouth Africa
  3. 3.Faculty of EducationCape Peninsula University of TechnologyCape TownSouth Africa

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