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Kids

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Abstract

Underpinning the popularity of both the professional and amateur game lies children’s, aka junior, football. Along with capturing the proclivity of the nation’s youth for idolising football heroes and/or for kicking a ball themselves, as an educational structure or an escape from adult supervision, film treatments such as Bend It Like Beckham (2002) show that the game here too can function as a wider indicator of political and gender resistance.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.De Montfort UniversityLeicesterUK

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