When You Write How People Want There Is No Guarantee of Success

  • Franck Aragão
  • Patrick Silva
  • José Remígio
  • Cleyton Souza
  • Evandro Costa
  • Joseana Fechine
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 746)

Abstract

The practice of sharing questions online has been called social query. One important factor that might contribute to increase the chance to receive answers is to attract others’ attention. To investigate this issue, we asked programmers about what they expect to find in “good” programming questions and end up with a list of sixteen suggestions on how to improve programming questions. However, we found the presence of more “good” characteristics correlates with none of question’s performance attributes (views, time for first response and number of answers). This means that, after being shared, other features not necessarily related with the “question form” have more influence in what happen with your question than the presence of these so called “good” characteristics. The experimental results were presented, providing a useful insight to go further in this investigation on social query.

Keywords

Social query Community question and answering sites User behavior Stack Overflow 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We want to thank IFPB – Campus Monteiro for the support of our research and our students.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Franck Aragão
    • 1
  • Patrick Silva
    • 1
  • José Remígio
    • 1
  • Cleyton Souza
    • 1
  • Evandro Costa
    • 2
  • Joseana Fechine
    • 2
  1. 1.Federal Institute of Science, Education and TechnologyMonteiroBrazil
  2. 2.Federal University of Campina GrandeCampina GrandeBrazil

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