Advertisement

Accessibility and Usability Assessment of a Web Platform: DADS (Doctors And Dyslexic System)

  • Tânia Rocha
  • Rui Carvalho
  • André Timóteo
  • Marco Vale
  • Arsénio Reis
  • João Barroso
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 746)

Abstract

Online tools for dyslexic diagnosis and training are mostly: free-of-charge; children-oriented, consisting in a game-based interface proved a positive correlation between video games and dyslexia [1]; and, provide auto-evaluation questions that are automatically analyzed, given results regarding the need of seeking medical attention, since these tools are not a medical exam or diagnostic. Other platforms consist on exercises/tests for dyslexic people or with speech and language impairments, helping them in the training of the word pronunciation. Although, there is a lack of solutions that allow doctors to register the evolution of their patients. In this article, it is presented an accessibility and usability assessment of a Web platform that allows children to do exercises but also lets their doctors to keep track of their evolution through graphs and detailed statistics, allowing doctors to have information on a digital format, disproving the need for tests normally done on paper [2, 3, 4], and not having to manually register variables.

Keywords

Web platform Diagnostic tests Training tests Dyslexia Accessibility assessments User tests 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the “Unidade de Dislexia” of the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, for the readiness to help and clarify questions related to the dyslexia, and the “Creative Tim”, for making available the template used in our platform [20]. This work was supported by Project “NIE – Natural Interfaces for the Elderly/NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-024048” financed by the Foundation for the Science and Technology (FCT) and through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

References

  1. 1.
    Franceschini, S., Gori, S., Ruffino, M., Viola, S., Molteni, M., Facoetti, A.: Action Video Games Make Dyslexic Children Read Better (2013). http://www.cell.com/current-biology/pdf/S0960-9822(13)00079-1.pdfCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Schneps, M.H., Thomson, J.M., Chen, C., Sonnert, G., Pomplun, M.: E-Readers are more effective than paper for some with dyslexia. PloS one 8(9), e75634 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Castellar, E.N., All, A., de Marez, L., Van Looy, J.V.: Cognitive abilities, digital games and arithmetic performance enhancement: a study comparing the effects of a math game and paper exercises (2014)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Prythercha, D.R., Smithb, G.B., Schmidta, P., Featherstonea, P.I., Stewartc, K., Knightc, D., Higgins, B.: Calculating early warning scores—a classroom comparison of pen and paper and hand-held computer methods (2005)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lyon, G.R., Shaywitz, S.E., Shaywitz, B.A.: A definition of dyslexia. Ann. Dyslexia 53, 1–14 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Patterson, K.E., Marcel, A.J.: Aphasia, dyslexia and the phonological coding of written words. Q. J. Exp. Psychol. 29(2), 307–318 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    De Luca, M., Borrelli, M., Judica, A., Spinelli, D., Zoccolotti, P.: Reading words and pseudowords: an eye movement study of developmental dyslexia. Brain Lang. 80(3), 617–626 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Sucena, A., Castro, S.L.: Consciência fonológica e conhecimento das relações letra-som no 1º ano de aprendizagem da leitura: estudo longitudinal (2007)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Agora Center: GraphoGame (2015). info.graphogame.com/
  10. 10.
    Agora Center: GraphoGame (2015). info.graphogame.com/partners/
  11. 11.
    Agora Center: GraphoGame (2015). info.graphogame.com/research/
  12. 12.
    Dybuster: DybusterOrtograph – What us it? (2015). https://dybuster.com/en/orthograph/was-ist-es/funktion
  13. 13.
    Dybuster: DybusterOrtograph – Why Game-Based Learning? (2015). https://dybuster.com/en/orthograph/was-ist-es/funktion
  14. 14.
    Dybuster: Dybuster Ortograph – Progress Monitoring (2015). https://dybuster.com/en/orthograph/who-is-it-for/kontrolle
  15. 15.
    Dybuster: DybusterOrtograph – Who is it For? (2015). https://dybuster.com/en/orthograph/who-is-it-for
  16. 16.
    AEA: Ainda estou a aprender – Livro. https://aindaestouaprender.com/img/livro.pdf
  17. 17.
    Kelly, D.H.: Visual contrast sensitivity. J. Modern Opt. 24(2), 107–129 (1977)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Smith, S.L., Mosier, J.N.: Guidelines for Designing User Interface Software. Mitre Corporation, Bedford (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Nielsen, J., Molich, R.: Heuristic evaluation of user interfaces. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pp. 249–256. ACM (1990)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Creative Tim: Paper-Dashboard (2016). https://www.creative-tim.com/product/paper-dashboard

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tânia Rocha
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Carvalho
    • 1
  • André Timóteo
    • 1
  • Marco Vale
    • 1
  • Arsénio Reis
    • 1
    • 2
  • João Barroso
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Sciences and TechnologyUniversity of Trás-os-Montes and Alto DouroVila RealPortugal
  2. 2.INESC TEC/UTADVila RealPortugal

Personalised recommendations