A Vulnerability Study of Mhealth Chronic Disease Management (CDM) Applications (apps)

Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 745)

Abstract

The mhealth applications industry has witnessed a significant growth both in revenue and popularity since its inception. The introduction of mhealth CDM apps has improved the management of chronic diseases as it provides the physicians with an opportunity to monitor their patients’ health for symptoms more efficiently and effectively. With the benefits of the mhealth CDM apps, also comes vulnerabilities that can cause unauthorized access to the patients’ health information and manipulation to the patients’ data. The presence of these vulnerabilities can cause harm to the patients’ health and reputations. Currently there is a lack of security assurance framework tailored to the mhealth CDM apps. In this regard, the objective of the research was to conduct a vulnerability study on mhealth CDM apps and to provide a set of security assurance recommendations tailored to the mhealth CDM apps for better security and assurance in the apps. In order to achieve the research objective, thirty mhealth CDM apps were tested for vulnerabilities using vulnerability scanner apps, after identifying the vulnerabilities, mobile applications related frameworks and guidelines were reviewed to come up with the security assurance recommendations for mhealth CDM apps.

Keywords

Vulnerability Mhealth CDM apps Security Assurance Recommendations Vulnerability scanners apps Criteria 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I acknowledge God Almighty, the Author and Finisher of my faith. I also acknowledge my parents and professors for their great support. Thank you.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Concordia University of EdmontonEdmontonCanada

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