General Background on Multi-robot Task Allocation

  • Anis Koubaa
  • Hachemi Bennaceur
  • Imen Chaari
  • Sahar Trigui
  • Adel Ammar
  • Mohamed-Foued Sriti
  • Maram Alajlan
  • Omar Cheikhrouhou
  • Yasir Javed
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 772)

Abstract

Multi-robot systems (MRSss) face several challenges, but the most typical problem is the multi-robot tasks allocation (MRTA). It consists in finding the efficient allocation mechanism in order to assign different tasks to the set of available robots. Toward this objective, robots will work as cooperative agents. MRTA aims at ensuring an efficient execution of tasks under consideration and thus minimizing the overall system cost. Various research works have solved the MRTA problem using the multiple traveling salesman problem (MTSP) formulation. In this context, an overview on MRTA and MTSP is given in this chapter. Furthermore, a summary of the related works is presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anis Koubaa
    • 1
  • Hachemi Bennaceur
    • 2
  • Imen Chaari
    • 3
  • Sahar Trigui
    • 3
  • Adel Ammar
    • 2
  • Mohamed-Foued Sriti
    • 2
  • Maram Alajlan
    • 2
  • Omar Cheikhrouhou
    • 4
  • Yasir Javed
    • 5
  1. 1.Prince Sultan UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.College of Computer and Information SciencesAl Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  3. 3.University Campus of ManoubaManoubaTunisia
  4. 4.College of Computers and Information TechnologyTaif UniversityTaifSaudi Arabia
  5. 5.College of Computer and Information SciencesPrince Sultan UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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