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Continuous State Power-Down Systems for Renewable Energy Management

  • James Andro-Vasko
  • Surya Ravali Avasarala
  • Wolfgang Bein
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 738)

Abstract

In the continuous power-down problem one considers a device, which has states OFF, ON, and an infinite number of intermediate states. The state of the device can be switched at any time. In the OFF state the device consumes zero energy and in the ON state it works at its full power consumption. The intermediate states consume only some fraction of energy proportional to usage time but switching back to the ON state has various switch up cost depending on the state. Requests for service, i.e. for when the device has to be in the ON state, are not known in advance; power-down problems are thus studied in the framework of online competitive analysis. Power-down can be used to model the control of traditional power generation in an electrical grid predominantly supplied by renewable energy. We analyze a number of systems, namely “linear”, “optimal-following”, “progressive”, “logarithmic” as well as “exponential”, and give competitive ratios for these systems. We show that highly competitive systems must have schedules which are accelerated from the offline solution.

Keywords

Green computing Power-down systems Online competitive analysis Renewable energy Game theory 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Discussions with Rüdiger Reischuk of Universität Lübeck during his sabbatical visit are acknowledged. The work of author Wolfgang Bein was supported by National Science Foundation grant IIA 1427584.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Andro-Vasko
    • 1
  • Surya Ravali Avasarala
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Bein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of NevadaLas VegasUSA

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