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Communicating Mexico’s International Development Cooperation: An Incipient Public Diplomacy Strategy

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Communication for Social Change book series (PSCSC)

Abstract

This chapter discusses elements of Mexico’s incipient public diplomacy strategy attached to its International Development Cooperation channeled through AMEXCID, which is still a relatively young agency. As it struggles with consolidating its internal organization and leadership, coupled with the lack of resources to carry out fully its mandate, these factors constitute a challenge for “branding” Mexico as an emerging economy with the capacity for undertaking global responsibility through its IDC programs and actions. Being a “translator” between different regions in the world and a “nodal point,” AMEXCID is involved in horizontal communication, multistakeholder communication, and communication through social media with domestic and foreign audiences, as well as identity-building activities and the creation of narratives that seek to convey a new image and soft power of Mexico.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author wishes to thank Juan Carlos Chimal, Samantha Reyes, and Juan Carlos Varillas for their help with background research, and Edgar Domínguez, Iván Espinosa, and Lorena López for their comments. Important insights into AMEXCID’s organization and communication strategies were provided through interviews with AMEXCID diplomats and officials, and representatives from civil society organizations. A special thanks to James Pamment for valuable input at the draft stage of this chapter.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Instituto MoraMexico CityMexico

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