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Urban Grids and Urban Imaginary: City to Cyberspace, Cyberspace to City

  • Paula GeyhEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The question that stands at the heart of this chapter is how the postmodern city is changing under the impact of globalization and new information and communication technologies. More specifically, the author asks how the postmodern city changes our ways of knowing and experiencing the world and ourselves as postmodern urban subjects and citizens of postmodernity. The chapter provides a discussion of the grid as both a central aspect of modern urban imaginaries and material urban spaces as well as considers the role of the grid at the interface between the city and cyberspace. In doing so, the author explores the grid as part of twentieth-century literary and artistic modernism and its replacement by the postmodern imaginary, with a particular focus on the relation between cityscapes and cyberspace.

Keywords

Grid Postmodern city Urban imaginaries Information technology Cyberspace Virtual reality 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA

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