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Using Blockchain to Support Data and Service Management in IoV/IoT

  • Obaro Odiete
  • Richard K. Lomotey
  • Ralph Deters
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 733)

Abstract

Two required features of a data monetization platform are query and retrieval of the metadata of the resources to be monetized. Centralized platforms rely on the maturity of traditional NoSQL database systems to support these features. These databases for example MongoDB allows for very efficient query and retrieval of data it stores. However, centralized platforms come with a bag of security and privacy concerns, making them not the ideal approach for a data monetization platform. On the other hand, most existing decentralized platforms are only partially decentralized. In this research, we developed Cowry, a platform for publishing of metadata describing available resources (data or services), discovery of published resources including fast search and filtering. Our main contribution is a fully decentralized architecture that combines blockchain and traditional distributed database to gain additional features such as efficient query and retrieval of metadata stored on the blockchain.

Keywords

IoV IoT Data monetization Blockchain MultiChain 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Obaro Odiete
    • 1
  • Richard K. Lomotey
    • 2
  • Ralph Deters
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Pennsylvania State UniversityMonacaUSA

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