Similarity and Difference in Conceptions of Well-Being Among Children and Young People in Four Contrasting European Countries

  • Jaroslav Mihálik
  • Michal Garaj
  • Alexandros Sakellariou
  • Alexandra Koronaiou
  • Giorgos Alexias
  • Magda Nico
  • Nuno de Almeida Alves
  • Marge Unt
  • Marti Taru
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 19)

Abstract

Despite substantial academic and policy interest in well-being there is no universally accepted definition of the concept. In the academic literature, it is used as an over-arching concept to refer to the quality of life of people in society. The purpose of this chapter is to present the findings of the MYWeB project regarding the conceptions of well-being among children and young people and the possible differences among them in four European countries (Portugal, Greece, Slovakia and Estonia). Based on qualitative research which makes the voice of children and young people heard, this chapter represents an important contribution to issues pertaining to the measurement of child well-being. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with children and young people addresses four questions: How do children and young people understand the concept of well-being? What do they attribute to well-being? Which are the main factors they consider important for their well-being? What are the similarities and differences among the four European countries? Having in mind that in order to organise and conduct a longitudinal survey on children and young people’s well-being the understanding of the concept of well-being is central, this chapter explores the different approaches and understandings of the concept and discuss the obstacles and problems that might arise in such a process.

Keywords

Well-being Quality of life Children Young people Europe Qualitative research 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaroslav Mihálik
    • 1
  • Michal Garaj
    • 1
  • Alexandros Sakellariou
    • 2
  • Alexandra Koronaiou
    • 2
  • Giorgos Alexias
    • 2
  • Magda Nico
    • 3
  • Nuno de Almeida Alves
    • 3
  • Marge Unt
    • 4
  • Marti Taru
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of Social SciencesUniversity of Saints Cyril and MethodiusTrnavaSlovakia
  2. 2.Panteion University of Social and Political SciencesAthensGreece
  3. 3.ISCTE – University Institute of LisbonLisbonPortugal
  4. 4.School of Governance, Law and Society, Institute of International Social StudiesTallinn UniversityTallinnEstonia

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