With a View Towards the Future: Working Towards an Accelerated European Cohort Survey

  • Gary Pollock
  • Jessica Ozan
  • Haridhan Goswami
  • Chris Fox
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 19)

Abstract

The book has so far exposed the policy needs and benefits, as well as the challenges, of implementing a cross-national longitudinal survey on children and young people’s well-being. This concluding chapter focuses on how the MYWeB project came to recommend a national accelerated survey design with a view to suggest a way forwards for a pan-European longitudinal study. It describes how different potential methodologies were evaluated in relation to scientific and policy needs as well as technical and financial feasibility. It concludes by highlighting the challenges involved in taking forward a European Longitudinal Survey of Children and Young People (ELSCYP) using an accelerated cohort design.

Keywords

Longitudinal survey Accelerated cohort survey Research funding Evidence based policy 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary Pollock
    • 1
  • Jessica Ozan
    • 1
  • Haridhan Goswami
    • 1
  • Chris Fox
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyManchester Metropolitan UniversityManchesterUK
  2. 2.Policy Evaluation and Research UnitManchester Metropolitan UniversityManchesterUK

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