Implementation-Oriented Freeway Traffic Control Strategies

Chapter
Part of the Advances in Industrial Control book series (AIC)

Abstract

When adopting optimisation-based control approaches in real time for freeway traffic systems, practical applicability and efficiency are extremely important aspects. The complexity of the traffic control problems to be solved increases with the dimension of the freeway system, making the centralised online application of the control strategies often problematic. In the literature, several solutions have been proposed in order to address these implementation issues. Some of them are aimed at simplifying the problem structure, while others are designed to reduce the overall computational and measurement transmission burden. This chapter focuses on different control solutions which are implementation-oriented. Specifically, distributed, decentralised and event-triggered control solutions for freeway traffic are discussed, also outlining the technological aspects which characterise their implementation.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of PaviaPaviaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems EngineeringUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly

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