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Linking Biodiversity Research Communities

  • Sonja Knapp
  • Alexandra Kraberg
  • Stephan Frickenhaus
  • Stefan Klotz
  • Oliver Schweiger
  • Gesche Krause
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Earth System Sciences book series (BRIEFSEARTHSYST)

Abstract

The ecology of terrestrial and marine ecosystems has been studied for over a hundred years and human utilization of both realms has been documented going back hundreds or even thousands of years.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We gratefully thank all experts at AWI and UFZ who participated in the Delphi-assessment and shared their views and insights. We acknowledge financial support by the ESKP initiative. This work is part of the PACES II Research Program at AWI, and of the Topic “Land Use, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services” at UFZ. Furthermore, the Helmholtz Office in Berlin, the Climate Service Centre in Hamburg as well as AWI and UFZ are acknowledged for hosting our meetings.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonja Knapp
    • 2
  • Alexandra Kraberg
    • 1
  • Stephan Frickenhaus
    • 1
  • Stefan Klotz
    • 2
  • Oliver Schweiger
    • 2
  • Gesche Krause
    • 1
  1. 1.Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP), Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine ScienceBremerhavenGermany
  2. 2.Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZHalle (Saale)Germany

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