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MCH, Sleep, and Neuroendocrine Functions

  • Carlos Eduardo Neves Girardi
  • Débora Cristina Hipólide
  • Vânia D’Almeida
Chapter

Abstract

Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is expressed in the central nervous system, primarily in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) (Bittencourt et al., J Comp Neurol, 319(2):218–45, 1992). A number of studies have suggested that MCH acts as an integrative peptide. Although its main function has been long regarded as the regulation of feeding behavior, its widespread fiber distribution throughout the brain suggests a role in a broader range of functions, especially metabolism, and reproductive and parental behavior, besides a putative involvement in the processing of rewarding stimuli. MCH also participates in arousal, being an important hormone related to sleep-wake behavior. In this chapter, we will discuss the role of MCH in behavioral, metabolic, and neuroendocrine functions.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos Eduardo Neves Girardi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Débora Cristina Hipólide
    • 1
  • Vânia D’Almeida
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychobiologyUniversidade Federal de São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  2. 2.Programa de Pós-Graduação em PsicossomáticaUniversidade IbirapueraSão PauloBrazil

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